BookitList - Psychologists Explain Why We All Miss Travel So MUCH!

Psychologists Explain Why We All Miss Travel So MUCH!

According to Simran Sethi, an educator and public speaker she says “her identity has been defined by travel.”


“I wrote a book that took me to five continents,”

“When I started moving, I thought it was temporary … But I’d get to the next place and say, ‘Where do I see myself?’ And I just kept coming back to, ‘I see myself everywhere.'”


With the coronavirus outbreak blocking any means of travel she summed it up by saying “I don’t know who I am anymore.”


Of course like many of us, Sethi is not the only one finding it difficult to cope with the lack of being able to travel free as a bird.

Some travellers may feel more irritable than usual or lacking gusto in every menial tasks. For others it’s a time to reflect on what travels have done for our characters thus far, or where our travels may lead us in the future.


Anxiety and stress without travel is understandable with those with an insatiable appetite for wanderlust but for those working in the travel sector, it’s the difference between putting food on the table or not.


Travel writer Erin Lindholm said:

“Personally, I feel unmoored, a bit directionless …”

“because everything about how travel is going to look in the future is such an unknown right now.”


Most people now frequently travel (once a year at minimum), but for those who identify themselves as a traveller, an untethered spirit unearthing fascinating creatures in the rockpool of life, it has become an alarming, existential problem.

The Travellers Mindset.

Seth Myers a Psy.D clinical psychologist said: “At [its] root, travel is a psychologically stimulating activity on a physical, visual and social level. Travel offers a break from the monotony of daily routines and often pulls people out of their comfort zone to the point that they often try new or unusual activities they wouldn’t be inclined to try from … their home base.”


For those who frequently fly, they may be gaining confidence, gratifying innate psychological needs and achieving a sense of self actualization along the way. It may seem far fetched to those who like staying still, but everyone has their own unique means of finding a psychological equilibrium...

Travel and adventure isn’t just limited to a flood of endorphins or a charming photo album to fondly look back on. It can become a lens that filters how we see the world and perhaps more importantly, how the world sees us.


Meyers went on to say: “For men and women who travel extensively for work, the travel — or the constant sense of being in motion — becomes a part of their identity.”

Managing The Loss Of Travel

She said “Without the distraction of where and what my next move will be, my mind [is] churning.”

“I question why I never took the time to breathe in the first place, or why I’ve always believed my life needs to be set in the fast lane.”


My priorities will shift when we can begin traveling again. I want to build more of a base and feel more grounded.”


If you’re thinking about how to fill the void, why not try planning your next trip?


We’ve got hundreds of events, destinations and festivals you can learn about and perhaps scrolling through and making your very own bookitlist can help inspire you to stay positive in the current climate!